In 1876, Loyal N Waterhouses moved his family from Salisbury Proper, to the shores of Lake Dunmore.  The Island that is now connected to the shore by our dock, provided the perfect protection from the weather for his Marina and boat building business.  Within a few years, Loyal gained a wide following for his rowboats and a number of these can be found in museums today!  You can find a number of old photographs in the Marina that date to this early period.
   What many people don't realize, is that most of the surrounding hillside, including Sunset Hill was pasture for the Waterhouses cattle. In fact, by 1900 Vermont was 90% Treeless.  Mary Waterhouses, Loyal's daughter, would visit the property once a year, ending in 1985, to visit a huge old Maple where she "used to" call the cows from.  The tree is still there!
   The Barn and House where also constructed in 1876 and both structures have undergone major reconstruction and updating. The Barn has been converted to an Office for the Keewaydin Foundation.  They manage Keewaydin camp for boys and Songadeewin for girls, both located on Lake Dunmore. The boys camp was founded in 1909, making it the second oldest Camp in the USA.
   The Waterhouses House was first constructed as a single story home.  During the "fix up", we realized that the house was actually jacked up and a first floor was constructed below it!  I guess they didn't want to waste a perfectly good roof.  Notice the high ceilings of the Moosalamoo Suite. The Great Room in the Dunmore suite was a woodshed that was converted into additional living space in the 1940's. We found the hand carved beams when we gutted the room and had to make them part of the look. The Stairs, colored windows on the ground floor and the wood floors are all original.  Check out the wide board flooring of the second story.
  We hope you enjoy your stay at the Waterhouses House and we look forward to having you back.
WATERHOUSES HISTORY